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Posts tagged ‘Italie’

Rodolfo Lando – “Tanos” 7

“Tre anni fa ho scoperto le mie origini italiane. Da quando ho fatto il corso d’italiano all’associazione dei calabresi di Buenos Aires, penso e sogno in italiano. Le parole che mi sono piaciute di più sono “pattumiera” e “rondine”. Le  parole hanno una musica. Adoro la musica di Rita Pavone e Teddy Reno dai tempi in cui ero ragazzo come nella foto che ti ho portato…
Sono stato 40 giorni in Europa e per la prima volta ho sentito l’allegria, la gioia di stare in Italia. Ho provato il piacere di parlare e capire l’italiano. Mi sono sentito libero. Quando penso all’Italia, penso al bisogno di tornare per conoscerla meglio. Sono stato a Sorrento e lì mi sentivo bene. In Argentina, si sente l’impronta italiana nella “mangia”.”

“Tres años atrás me encontré con mis orígenes italianos. Desde que hice el curso de la asociación italiana de Calabria en Buenos Aires, pienso y sueño en italiano. Las palabras que más me gustaron son “pattumiera” (basura) y “rondine” (golondrina). Las palabras tienen su propia música. Me encanta la música de Rita Pavone, Teddy Reno, de los tiempos en que era mas joven, lo ves en la foto que te traje…
Me fui 40 días en Europa y por primera vez sentí la alegría, la alegría de estar en Italia. Sentí el placer de hablar y entender italiano. Me sentí libre. Cuando pienso en Italia, siento la necesidad de volver a conocerla mejor. He estado en Sorrento y me sentía bien. En Argentina, se siente la influencia tana al momento de “morfar”.”

“Three years ago I discovered my Italian origins. Since I’ve been doing the Italian course at the Calabria association of Buenos Aires, I think and dream in Italian. The words that I liked the most are “pattumiera” (garbage) and “rondine” (swallow). Words have their own musicality. I love the music of Rita Pavone, Teddy Reno, since the time I was young, as you can see on the picture I brought you…
I’ve been 40 days in Europe and for the first time I felt the pleasure of staying in Italy. I was happy to speak and understand Italian. I felt free. When I think about Italy, I think I need to come back to know it better. I was in Sorrento and I was so happy. In Argentina, you can feel the Italian influence when you eat.”

Buenos Aires. Argentina, 2016-2017. © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

10 Jul 2017

Rosina Valicenti – “Tanos” 5

Rosina Valicenti, born in Amendolara, Italy, on 1948. Tanos project 5.

“I didn’t chose to come here: why did you bring me here, I used to ask my mother. My dad, Francesco, bricklayer, missed Italy, not my mother who wanted to stay in Argentina”. “At home we used to talk about  war and work, I remember listening to songs of war: that was what I used to hear about Italy.”
“When I was 20 years old I traveled to Italy with my mother. During this trip I realized a conflict of values: the Italians were attached to money and they seemed to me more discriminatory”.
Fabrizio, his older brother went from Argentina to Spain for 4-5 years working as a bricklayer like her dad …but making the way backwards.
Argentinean or “Tana” ? Rosina is looking for an answer as she feels a “vacuum of identity”.

“Yo no había elegido de venir acá: para que me trajiste acá preguntaba siempre a mi mamá. Mi papá, Francesco, albañil, extrañaba Italia, mamá no, quería quedarse en Argentina”. “En casa se hablaba de guerra y de trabajo. Se cantaban canciones de la guerra: esto me quedaba de Italia”.
“Cuando tenia 20 años viajé a Italia con mi mamá. Durante esta viaje me di cuenta de un conflicto de valores: los italianos eran apegados a la plata y mas discriminatorios”.
Fabrizio, su hermano mayor se fue de Argentina a España durante 4-5 años trabajando como albañil como el papá…pero haciendo el camino al revés.
Argentina o tana ? Rosina, me cuenta, busca la respuesta: siente un “vacío de identidad”.

Buenos Aires. Argentina, 2016-2017. © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

5 May 2017

Hugo del Casale – “Tanos” 3

“Tano”. Aferesi di “napolitano”. All’origine dispregiativo, è diventato poi un termine affettuoso che abbraccia italiani e oriundi d’Argentina. Anch’io sono “tano”. “Lontano” sarebbe l’altra origine di “tano”.
Narra la leggenda che un tipo, nel porto di Buenos Aires, chiese ad un emigrante appena sbarcato da dove veniva. L’emigrante senza voltarsi e già con la testa carica di preoccupazioni e speranza, rispose…”da lontano”. Il tipo udì appena le due ultime sillabe.
Il “tano” Hugo del Casale, barbiere di successo, nato a Vasto nel 1945 e arrivato a Buenos Aires nel 1960 per raggiungere il padre. “Sono argentino e amo l’Italia: quando uno vede questo [8 metri di tricolore], ha capito tutto”.
“Tanos project” (3).

“Tano” is an aphaeresis of “Napoletano” (Neapolitan). Originally pejorative, it later became a positive term identifying all Italians and with Italian origins, living in Argentina. I am a “tano”, for example. “Lontano” (far away) it’s the other explanation of the word “tano”.
According to another less popular version, a guy asked an Italian immigrant just arrived by boat,  from where he came from. The immigrant heading to the new life of fear and hope, replied “da lontano…” (from far away…). The guy, only got the last two syllables…
The “tano” Hugo del Casale, successful barber, was born in Vasto in 1945 and arrived in Buenos Aires in 1960 to join his father. “I am Argentinean and I love Italy: watch this [8meters Italian flag], it tells everything…”
“Tanos project” (3).

Buenos Aires. Argentina, 2016-2017. © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

11 Apr 2017

Orio dal Porto – “Tanos” 2

Orio dal Porto, scultore, nato a Lucca nel 1938 e arrivato a Buenos Aires nel 1963. Fotografato nel suo atelier il 28 maggio 2016, lo sguardo già lontano. Tre mesi dopo dal nostro incontro, ci ha lasciato. Ci ha lasciato le sue opere, in collezioni private, nelle piazze di Buenos Aires (Taras Shevchenko) e nella “casa rosata” (Raul Alfonsin). “Tanos” project (2).

Orio dal Porto, sculptor, born in Lucca in 1938 and arrived in Buenos Aires in 1963. Photographed in his studio 28th May 2016, with his lost gaze. Three months after we met, he left us. He left us his artworks, in private collections, in the streets of Buenos Aires (Taras Shevchenko) and in the presidential “casa rosada” (Raul Alfonsin). “Tanos” project (2).

Buenos Aires. Argentina, 2016-2017. © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

 

4 Apr 2017

“Originals”

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Fusione o asimmetria socio-culturali? Rho, Italia, September 2015. © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

24 Nov 2016

Out of place

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On the beach. Rho, Italia, September 2015. © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

14 Nov 2016

Alen: people and words from Sarajevo

Words and people from Sarajevo: Alen“Words and people from Sarajevo”, work in progress. Alen is an excellent pianist and opera singer. And most of all – for me – a very good friend. He lived and studied music in Sarajevo and his dream was always to live thanks to the music. Unfortunately he had to leave his beloved country because of lack of opportunities. After many years, thanks to his determination he went to Italy (his second country…) where he is now working as a singer. Bosnia and Herzegovina, February 2011 © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

31 Mar 2014

Orgosolo street art

“When the missionaries came they had the Bible and we had the land. We closed our eyes and prayed. When we opened our eyes we had the Bible in our hands and they had our land.”
This is a quote of Desmond Tutu, joint to one of the many murals that show the social awareness of the people Orgosolo, a small village hidden in the mountains of Sardinia.
The village managed to leave behind a long and heavy heritage of violence and lack of social justice and turned Orgosolo on an extraordinary spot of street and social engaged art.
A local teacher, Francesco Del Casino, and a group of students launched the artistic and social process. Inspired by the Mexican muralists of the begin of the past century, students and local artists started to paint the walls of the village with stories of its past and to reproduce Italy’s and world’s main social and political events, from the slavery to the present time.

Orgosolo, Italy, August 2013 © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

26 Sep 2013

Resting in the shade of a tree


Kids resting in the shade of a tree in the Nuraghes archaeological site of Serra Orrios in Sardinia. The “Nuraghi” are the main type of ancient megalithic building found in Sardinia, developed during the Nuragic Age between 1900-730 BC. Today it’s one of the symbols of the island and its distinctive culture, the Nuragic civilisation. Dorgali, Italy, July 2013 © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

17 Aug 2013

Comparison

A mural in a street of a small village of Sardinia. Orgosolo, Italy, July 2013 © Luca Bonacini. Copyright: the pictures on this site are the property of the author and cannot be used without permission.

11 Aug 2013